Hello, I’m David.

Hi. I’m David. I also live here at Kibbutz Detropia and this is the part of the blog where I introduce myself. My journey towards this place probably stems largely from my experiments in communal living. Rainbow Gatherings, Co-ops, squats, farms, summer camps and circus tour busses; they have all informed me about the value of living in close, cooperative communities. I grew up in the suburbs of Detroit, but never actually imagined I would live back here. I spent years traveling and moving from place to place searching for my utopian vision of community. I have honed my ideas about what that means for years, as I have tried my hand in a wide variety of living arrangements.
When I went to college I immediately signed up to live in a Co-op. I loved the whole culture I landed in. We cooked together, cleaned together, created together and shared viscously. The aim of everyone seemed to outdo how much you could contribute to the community. I also found it fascinating the breadth of thoughts, ideas and interests in all the people there. Despite sometimes heated debate we all came together to discuss important issues on policy and action.
I’ll skip ahead a few years to when I started a circus troupe. I bought an old school bus and converted it into a mobile living space, and 8 of us set off. This was another challenge in community creation. Eight people living aboard one bus took some serious space negotiation and task delineation. But we all had a shared purpose in mind: To travel to small towns and perform our show to audiences for free. The whole experience was electrifying.
Now fast forward again. After spending about a year recovering from a brain tumor that rendered me almost completely incapacitated we focused our sights on creating the type of community that we both missed and longed for. We spent years talking about and dreaming up our ideal community plans. After aiming to get a whole group together all at once we finally found the perfect place in a very secluded street on the western most edge of Detroit. We bought one house, and from the get go had our sights on the other vacant or abandoned homes in the area. We have carried our utopian vision of community with us and decided to name our place Kibbutz Detropia. So here we are now. We are looking to grow into a space to house a wide breadth of thoughts and ideas, and to grow together with a shared sense of purpose.

Who are We (Part One)

AKA: Who Are Part of We

I’ve been finding myself struggling quite desperately to write our first blog. I’m not sure what it is. I have written frequent blogs in the past, but there is something that lingers about having to write the first one.

A dear Bunny of mine mentioned that it’s an introduction… share who we are and what we do, but wow… that felt so intimidating! It got me contemplating the enormity of all that we do here at this home, space, farm, diner, bnb, school, oh… it just goes on and on…

So, I thought I could start at the very beginning and we could just introduce ourselves.

I’m home with Avi right now, and he is sleeping soundly, so today… I suppose I will introduce you to me.

If we haven’t met, well, hello, if we have, thanks for bothering to read this and I hope to include something new that you don’t know… to keep you intrigued. 😉

I’ve been daydreaming about how it is I came to be here, running a urban farm community in the city of Detroit… and it really is due to a series of accidents. Never, was any bit of this my intention.

I began life in Wisconsin, although I’ve only spent small bouts of time there and it doesn’t feel much like home to me. My parents quickly moved us to Minneapolis. We lived happily there for several years until my parents determined that they were not living happily enough to keep doing what they had been doing.

My mom and I moved to very Southern Texas, so my mother could get teaching experience. We were going there for a year! She just retired there a few weeks ago!

I left Texas when I was about to enter Junior High as I wasn’t a fan of Texas. I went to live with my dad, back in Minnesota, but we fairly quickly ended up in Los Angeles… where I dropped out of high school… and went directly to college. At the time I wanted to be a vet. That feels like eons ago.

I won’t regale you of all the times I have moved and all the colleges and people I got to be. That’s too long of a story.

I did get to return to Minneapolis for a chunk of time, lived in Ohio, a cabin in Wisconsin, law school in  Massachusetts and then… here… in Michigan. We lived on a farm with a mime in a garden shed before we landed here in Detroit. Not to mention that the reason we came to Michigan in the first place was that David needed imminent brain surgery and his insurance only worked here. *phew* Once that was dealt with we began searching for homes.

Our intention was to have a farm/ Intentional Community. We were not set on any sort of community. We had ads up on intentional community websites, we had several people who had shown interest in beginning this project with us, but one by one… they all disappeared.

We had settled on a different house and this one was stumbled on by another happy accident. This is our third summer here, and we have transitioned now, from have to’s, to want to’s. Its liberating… knowing that I may re-do the floor, not that I have to install a water heater. The basement still floods a bit and needs an overhaul, but the quotes we have received to fix it, are so insurmountable, I usually ignore that the basement exists.

It’s a hot and sunny day and I should be out watering the cucumbers so they don’t faint from the heat, but Mister Avi decided to take a very late nap today. I’ve lost my train of thought. I find it quite difficult to ramble on about myself at length, although from the looks of it, I have done alright.

I pulled up this third person story about me that we included in a Kibbutz Fact Sheet because I wasn’t sure I would know what to say. How silly is that? I need to read about myself to write about myself! tsk tsk.

One thing in the write up that stood out to me was the mention that I am currently enrolled in the Kohenet training program, and the concern I often feel about how that will work in 2019. I will be an ordained clergy, when I graduate in the summer of 2019, but I will be returning home, to a place that doesn’t know that this position exists, and its a tricky idea… knowing how to be a respected clergy member in a world that doesn’t know what you are. I do believe that with this blog, I will be making sure that at least, dear readers, know what a Kohenet does… as many of them are the most magical, world changing women I have ever been lucky enough to meet. I better run and tend to my cucumbers and my napping Mister Avi. I’ll attach a photo of us and the silly third person write up as well.

I am really looking forward to sharing this journey with you and co-creating a new vision of the world, with you as well… this is about us… as a collective… as all things are.

I look forward to learning, playing, making, growing… and all the other things we get to do… with you!

Rakia/ Sky

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David                                                  Avi                                                        Sky

 

“Sky has a surprisingly varied background. She holds both a bachelors in criminology and forensic science and a Juris Doctorate. She has attended art school, joined the circus and worked in farming and activism for the majority of her life.

She is currently enrolled in the Kohenet training program and will be ordained in the summer of 2019.

She graduated from the Urban Roots Program in 2017.

She has a mad passion for self sufficiency, earth based practice, treading lightly on the soil, teaching, drumming, sacred arts, creation, and helping others learn the skills to become more self sufficient and sustainable.

She was raised between South Texas and Minneapolis by a mother who brought Earth Day to South Texas and now serves on several local environmental boards, and a father who brings music to all four corners of the world.”